‘court’ Tagged Posts

U.S. appeals court sends BlackBerry lawsuit back to lower court

New York (Reuters) - A US appeals court yesterday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit BlackBerry Ltd. alleges fraud inflating its stock price by pain...

 

U.S. appeals court sends BlackBerry lawsuit back to lower court

New York (Reuters) – A US appeals court yesterday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit BlackBerry Ltd. alleges fraud inflating its stock price by painting a cheerful picture of the prospects for its Blackberry Z10 smartphone line that was misleading

While the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals in New York did not say the lawsuit to establish a credible claim to reconsider the order of a lower court or to let you edit the plaintiffs their complaint in light of what she has said new evidence.

Neither BlackBerry or an attorney for lead plaintiffs Todd Cox and Maria Dinzik immediately responded to requests for comment.

BlackBerry Z10 has his phone in January 2013 in an attempt to Apple Inc’s iPhone market share loss story, and Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. devices powered by Google Inc.’s Android.

The Blackberry Z10 won positive reviews but low sales led to an expected $ 930 million Skryf down for unsold stock on September 20, 2013. BlackBerry shares lost about a sixth of their value on that day.

The Waterloo, Ontario- based company dethrone its CEO, Thorsten Heins, less than two months later.

The lawsuit alleged that BlackBerry tried the poor performance of the Z10 hides to artificially increase its share.

In the decision Wednesday, the 2nd Circuit upheld US District Judge Thomas Griesa’s March 2015 dismissal of the lawsuit for not claiming that BlackBerry and its directors knowingly deceived investors.

The three-judge appeals panel said amounted claims plaintiffs’ fraud by hindsight “by saying that the suspects had to wipe the device will not be successful.

The court nevertheless said Griesa could try to convince prosecutors to allow you to edit their complaint in the light of new regs development and proof that prosecutors said would support their demands.

the Court of Appeal has said if Griesa refuse to let you edit their complaint to prosecutors, he has his reasons, which he did not explain for.

The case is Cox v. BlackBerry Limited, 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals, No. 15-3991.

(Reporting by Nate Raymond in New York, Editing by W Simon and JS Benkoe)

Russian court turns down appeal from Google in anti-monopoly case

 

Russian court turns down appeal from Google in anti-monopoly case

Moscow (Reuters) – A Russian court yesterday rejected an appeal against Google in an anti-monopoly case preinstalled apps on mobile devices with the Android operating system, reported Interfax news agency

Earlier, Russia’s anti-monopoly watchdog FAS imposed 438000000 rubles ($ 6.83 million) fine on Google after ruling that the company has violated Russian anti-monopoly rules.

(Reporting by Alexander Wen, writing by Denis Pinchuk)

Irish privacy watchdog refers Facebook’s U.S. data transfers to EU court

 

Irish privacy watchdog refers Facebook's U.S. data transfers to EU court

Brussels / DUBLIN (Reuters) -. Data transfer to the US by companies such as Facebook and Google to face a renewed legal threat after the Irish privacy watchdog said yesterday that Facebook will pay the data transfer mechanisms to the top EU court

The following step an Irish investigation of Facebook users EU transfer of data to the United States to ensure that properly protect privacy against surveillance US government.

Facebook, like many other technology companies, has its European headquarters in Dublin and is regulated by the Irish Data Protection Commissioner (IDPC).

The IDPC said they will ask the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) to determine the validity of Facebook’s “model contracts”. – General legal regulations that are used by thousands of companies to transfer personal data outside the 28-nation EU

The investigation into the California-based company is provided by the Irish High Court in October to the CJEU affected Safe Harbor , an EU-US agreement that has allowed the free transfer of information between the European Union and the United States. The CJEU decided the agreement does not protect enough information Europeans against US supervision.

The transfer of Europeans to the United States has been a hot topic since 2013 revelations about mass US surveillance programs like PRISM, which US authorities private information directly from a large technology companies like Apple harvest, Facebook and Google .

new agreement

Since the CJEU ruling, companies had to rely on model contracts and other more cumbersome steps to transfer data Europeans to the United States in accordance with strict EU rules data privacy .

“Thousands of companies to transfer data across borders to serve their customers and users,” said a spokesman for Facebook. “Demand Irish DPC plan to gather with the judge in connection with standard contractual clauses will be many companies that are involved in Europe,” she said, adding that Facebook has a number of legal ways of data to the United States.

The CJEU decision in October stemmed from a complaint by Austrian regstudent and privacy activist Max Schrems. He questioned the data of European users to transfer its US servers of Facebook, with regard to the risks of American espionage.

“We have yesterday informedĂ‚ Mr. SchremsĂ‚ and Facebook our intention explanatory reliefĂ‚ looking Ina Irish Supreme Court and a reference to the CJEU to determine Thea legala status transfers data under standard contractual clauses,” the IDPC.

One of the reasons why the ECJ struck Safe Haven is because the agreement, EU citizens provides enough channels to complain about American surveillance.

Schrems and other privacy campaign claims that alternative arrangements such model clauses Europeans either do not offer a means of correction.

“There is no way that the CJEU can say that model contracts are valid if they Safe Harbor killed on the basis of the existence of the US surveillance laws,” Schrems said in a statement.

After the CJEU decision in October, the EU Commission and the United States rushed to hash out a new data-sharing agreement, the privacy shield, which they hope as soon as possible by the end-June.

But EU privacy watchdogs have raised some concerns about the course, raises the fear that it can not withstand a court challenge.

“If the court decides that the standard contractual provision can not be trusted and that the transfer of personal information they need to facilitate stopped, the impact on the international business will be catastrophic,” said Oliver Yaros, an attorney Mayer Brown.

(Editing by Susan Fenton and David Clarke)